Artwork

Emily Carr

Semi-hottie?

Everyone is crazy about this chick. She is what you would call, Victoria’s celebrity or a Canadian icon. She was born in 1871 in Victoria and became an artist and writer. She has a university named after her, a library in her name, and a number of elementary schools as her namesake. Personally, she bugs me. Only because everyone is spending too much time focusing on her, when they could be focusing on me.

Here’s a little background on the Carr klan:

The Carr children were raised on English tradition. Richard Carr, born in England, believed it was sensible to live in Vancouver Island, a colony of Great Britain, where he could practice English customs and continue his British citizenship.

Okay, Dick, can I call you Dick? Why did you move when you could have practiced English customs and continue your British citizenship in oh, I don’t know, England? Seems like a weird decision. He was most likely running away from something. Possibly going to jail. How selfish. Emily was probably pissed. So she had to get her anger out by painting pictures of trees and totem poles. I’m assuming that’s how it was.

I guess she was inspired by the “indigenous peoples of the pacific northwest coast” which already annoys me because I hate Native art, as you well know. Her artwork is decent, but nothing that would be considered life-changing. Let’s compare these paintings shall we?

Emily Carr, I’m sure your dad was a psycho, but that’s not an excuse to paint really terribly. Your fame will forever baffle me.

Anna Kostenko's painting of a tree.

Emily Carr's picture of trees.

Advertisements
Standard